LMU Library News

Featured Resource: American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990

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We have a new and exciting resource to share here in the William H. Hannon Library. American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Papers, 1912-1990 is an e-resource that is part of Gale’s Making of Modern Law collection and draws from the records of the ACLU. It focuses on civil rights, race, gender, and issues relating to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The ACLU has been a non-profit organization since nearly the beginning of the 20th century. The ACLU is composed of lawyers and civil rights activists that believe in equal treatment and civil liberties for all people living in the United States under the Constitution. Recently, the ACLU has made many headlines for filing a lawsuit against President Trump’s executive order that bars refugees and citizens of seven Muslim countries form gaining entry into the United States. The ACLU was granted a temporary injunction against the immigration order. We at the library believe that this e-resource is especially relevant to the current political climate and the controversies being debated in regards to immigration, reproductive rights, and free speech.

One of the most useful features of the ACLU Papers is the ability to cross-search capabilities with other Gale primary source databases as well as the ability to browse documents (see screenshot #4). Please keep in mind that this resource is not accessible in OneSearch+.

Below we will show you how to conduct a basic search using American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990

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The homepage for the American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990

 

The American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990 uses predictive text to help you with your search

The American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990 uses predictive text to help you with your search

 

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This what the results page looks like

 

The ability to browse through important documents (without leaving your computer) that helped shape our civil liberties is truly amazing.

The ability to browse through important documents (without leaving your computer) that helped shape our civil liberties is truly amazing.

We hope you will find this resource useful to both your academic and everyday information needs. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions!

Today’s post was written by Librarian-in-Residence Rachel Deras.